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Thursday, December 17, 2020

Another 2020 Snow Day

This image features my garden during a snowstorm that occurred on 12-16-2020. At least eight inches of snow had probably fallen when the picture was taken and it can be sen piled up on various surfaces of my garden (the floor, the shelving, the planters etc). The ”scene” looks like a bunch of white cakes sitting outside. Snow was also still falling when the photo was taken.    To the left of the photo at the back (or top of the picture) my contorted hazel nut (a shrub) is located and his branches have been decorated with white Christmas lights. There is a replica in the form of a light fixture) of The Star of Bethlehem  atop the shrub. Contorted hazelnuts bear the latin name of Harry’s Walking Stick.  To the left of this shrub, I have a Christmas tree who is decorated with white lights and has an “average” star as her tree topper. To her left (or in the upper right hand corner of the image) is where my Larch is located. There are string lights hanging above my garden. My garden is the setting for my three volume book series, “Words In Our Beak.” You can read about these books in another blog post @ https://www.thelastleafgardener.com/2018/10/one-sheet-book-series-info.html
MY GARDEN IS THE SETTING FOR MY BOOK SERIES

In my last posting here on Blogger, which was last Thursday, December 10th, 2020, I mentioned that we were having a snow day. That incident was a wet snowfall and the accumulation was not much, nor did snow stick on the ground. 

Yesterday, December 16th 2020, six days after the aforementioned event, we had another snowfall in NYC. According to news repors, including NY1, "This is the biggest December snowfall since 2009, when we [NYC] recieved 10.9 inches that year.  It also doubled New York's total winter snowfall from last year, with 10.5 inches at Central Park." 

Most of the snowfall has ended as of this blog post.

The atmosphere it created in my garden was truly magical as you might surmise from the photograph atop this entry which I took late last night. In the next image you can see how my garden looked in relation to the buildings in close proximity.

This “aerial” image was taken from the vantage point of a high rise building in close proximity to me.  It features rooftops of buildings covered in snow and my garden during a snowstorm that occurred on 12-16-2020.  The picture was taken from far away so other than the string lights which hang above my place, details of my garden are not recognizable.  For your info, my garden is the setting for my three volume book series, “Words In Our Beak.” You can read about these books in another blog post @ https://www.thelastleafgardener.com/2018/10/one-sheet-book-series-info.html
MY GARDEN IS THE SETTING FOR MY BOOK SERIES

Unfortunately, the weight of the snow caused a portion of my string lights to detatch from the pole which as evidenced in the follwing photo.

This image features my garden during a snowstorm that occurred on 12-16-2020. At least eight inches of snow had probably fallen when the picture was taken and it can be seen piled up on various surfaces of my garden (the floor, the shelving, the planters etc). The ”scene” looks like a bunch of white cakes sitting outside. Snow was also still falling when the photo was taken.    To the left of the photo at the back (or top of the picture) my contorted hazel nut (a shrub) is located and his branches have been decorated with white Christmas lights. There is a replica in the form of a light fixture) of The Star of Bethlehem  atop the shrub. Contorted hazelnuts bear the latin name of Harry’s Walking Stick.  To the left of this shrub, I have a Christmas tree who is decorated with white lights and has an “average” star as her tree topper. To her left (or in the upper right hand corner of the image) is where my Larch is located.   There are string lights hanging above my garden but in this image they have become detached due to the snow so only part of them are still above my place. Hope to get it fixed when weather permits.  My garden is the setting for my three volume book series, “Words In Our Beak.” You can read about these books in another blog post @ https://www.thelastleafgardener.com/2018/10/one-sheet-book-series-info.html
MY GARDEN IS THE SETTING FOR MY BOOK SERIES

Hopefully once things melt, Juan V can stop by and reattach them.

ADDENDUM:

On 12-23-2020, Juan V was able to stop by and fix the broken zip tie (as seen in the next image)....

Juan V the man seen in this photo is fixing a broken zip tie that supported stringlights in my garden. My garden is the setting for my three voume book series, "Words In Our Beak." Info re these books is on my blog @ https://www.thelastleafgardener.com/2018/10/one-sheet-book-series-info.html
JV MAKING A REPAIR IN MY GARDEN
(THE PLACE WHERE WIOB* IS SET)

...which had caused the lights to come down.

Once he fixed that, he added lights to my a portion of the branches of my kiwi vines (as seen on the lefthand side in the next picture).

This image features my garden. To the left of the photo at the back (or top of the picture) my contorted hazel nut (a shrub) is located and his branches have been decorated with white Christmas lights. There is a replica in the form of a light fixture) of The Star of Bethlehem  atop the shrub. Contorted hazelnuts bear the latin name of Harry’s Walking Stick.  To the left of this shrub, I have a Christmas tree who is decorated with white lights and has an “average” star as her tree topper. To her left (or in the upper right hand corner of the image) is where my Larch is located.  A portion of the branches for my kiwi vines can be seen at the right hand side of the top of te picture. These branches are also decorated with Christmas lights. There are string lights hanging above my garden. My garden is the setting for my three volume book series, “Words In Our Beak.” You can read about these books in another blog post @ https://www.thelastleafgardener.com/2018/10/one-sheet-book-series-info.html
MY GARDEN IS THE SETTING FOR WIOB*

*WIOB is the abbreviation for the title of my book series, Words In Our Beak where the stories are set in y rooftop garden.

Thursday, December 10, 2020

Tuesday, December 8, 2020

John Lennon Was Assassinated Forty Ago (Tuesday's Truths WK 200)


This evening will mark the fortieth anniversary of John Lennon being shot in front of The Dakota where he had one of his homes. That building is one block west and seven blocks south of the UWS street (79th) of where I saw this tree featured in the image directly atop this poting.

Monday, December 7, 2020

A Recent Visit

This photo features a male house finch perched on the branches of an Ailanthus tree. A web-page re this bird describes this bird type by saying, “ House Finch males are more orangey-red with color equally bright on crown, throat, and breast. Red color is mostly restricted to head and upper chest, contrasting with cold gray-brown nape, back, and wings. Pale sides show distinct brown streaks, lacking red tones. Females lack bold face pattern and have more diffuse patterning overall. Often sings loudly in neighborhoods and visits feeders.” House finches have a backstory in volume one of my book series, “Words In Our Beak,” where I describe how they were nearly wiped off the Eastern seaboard due to issues with their eyesight. Info re my books is in another post on my blog @  https://www.thelastleafgardener.com/2018/10/one-sheet-book-series-info.html
HOUSE FINCHES HAVE A BACKSTORY IN VOL 1

This photo features a male house finch perched on the branches of an Ailanthus tree. A web-page re this bird describes this bird type by saying, “ House Finch males are more orangey-red with color equally bright on crown, throat, and breast. Red color is mostly restricted to head and upper chest, contrasting with cold gray-brown nape, back, and wings. Pale sides show distinct brown streaks, lacking red tones. Females lack bold face pattern and have more diffuse patterning overall. Often sings loudly in neighborhoods and visits feeders.” House finches have a backstory in volume one of my book series, “Words In Our Beak,” where I describe how they were nearly wiped off the Eastern seaboard due to issues with their eyesight. Info re my books is in another post on my blog @  https://www.thelastleafgardener.com/2018/10/one-sheet-book-series-info.html
HOUSE FINCHES HAVE A BACKSTORY IN VOL 1

This photo features a male house finch perched on the branches of an Ailanthus tree. A web-page re this bird describes this bird type by saying, “ House Finch males are more orangey-red with color equally bright on crown, throat, and breast. Red color is mostly restricted to head and upper chest, contrasting with cold gray-brown nape, back, and wings. Pale sides show distinct brown streaks, lacking red tones. Females lack bold face pattern and have more diffuse patterning overall. Often sings loudly in neighborhoods and visits feeders.” House finches have a backstory in volume one of my book series, “Words In Our Beak,” where I describe how they were nearly wiped off the Eastern seaboard due to issues with their eyesight. Info re my books is in another post on my blog @  https://www.thelastleafgardener.com/2018/10/one-sheet-book-series-info.html
HOUSE FINCHES HAVE A BACKSTORY IN VOL 1

I have only been able to take a couple of walks in my nearby parks since March (2020) because the coating on my lenses of my prescription lenses has worn off and replacing them is out of my financial reach at this time.

Unfortunately since the coating is damaged, my glassses steam up constantly when I wear  a face-mask and I can't see where I am going which is very frightening.

I have tried many "home remedies" to prevent the steaming but because the issue has to do with the coating, my battle is endless.

Moreover, due to the fact that I fell last January (which resulted in my  breaking my Greater tuberosity), I am feeling vulnerable when it comes to the prospect of falling, SOOOO... I have had to stay at home more than I would like to, and I miss the parks!

Therefore, my spirits were lifted the other day when I discovered that a lone male House finch was spening some of his time perching on the branches of Ailanthus trees in the courtyard (as evidenced in the imagess atop this posting).

Friday, November 27, 2020

Deck the Walls!


 For today, November 27th and this coming Monday, Fine Art America (AKA FAA) is offering 25% of all wall art and that discount includes work created by yours truly.

Most of my selections can be seen in thumbnail format on my "poster" atop this entry.

Admittedly, the thumbnails are too small to decipher but the images can be viewed in larger formats on FAA.

Row 1, within this poster, is from my Nature Collection.  Row 2, within this poster, is from my Black & White Collection and Row 3, within this poster, is from my Dragonfly in Central Park Collection. Meanwhile, the image directly below features thumbnails of my kaleidoscopic collection.

MY KALEIDOSCOPICS

The following image a few thumbnails from my Holiday collection

FROM THE HOLIDAY COLLECTION

This next image features thumbnails of my Mandarin duck collection.

MANDARIN DUCK COLLECTION

FAA has the ability to render my images on a range of sizes for wall art and they can print my works on an array of surfaces (including arcylic, art paper, canvas, metal, poster paper as well as wood). Moreover, they can frame the art work if need be.

THEIR 25% DISCOUNT SHOWS UP AT CHECK OUT TODAY, 11-27-2020 AND ON 11-30-2020.

So why not deck your walls with art or give it as a gift, which will surely be appreciated since people will need to stay at home due to the coronavirus pandemic surging.

Tuesday, November 24, 2020

Tam (Rescued Pigeon) Survives Infecion! Tuesday's Truths WK 199

This is a photo montage featuring a pictorial account of a rescued pigeon. The left side of the montage has a brown talk-bubble at the top and text in it reads:   “I’m calling from the Wild Bird Fund about a fledgling pigeon you brought to the clinic on October 13th. I have good news, the pigeon was released on November 20th, along with 15 other pigeons, thank you for rescuing the bird.”  Below the talk bubble are three small pictures. The top one is a closed holiday-themed paper shopping bag with red handles. The second one is of a pigeon who fell ill and whom I rescued with someone's help. He is a pigeon fledgling. The picture hows him in that shopping bag which was used to carry him to The Wild Bird Fund in NYC. The third one shows him sitting on a tile floor before he was placed in the bag for transport.   On the left side of the montage is a picture of the WBF’s storefront.  The WBF as well as pigeons are just two of many topics featured in my book series, "Words In Our Beak." Info re these books is on my blog @ https://www.thelastleafgardener.com/2018/10/one-sheet-book-series-info.html

A little over one month ago (on 10-13-2020), with help of a colleague, I rescued a pigeon (now named Tam) who was in my garden on the UWS of NYC; and took him to The Wildbird Fund (AKA WBF), NYC's wonderful and only bird rehab center. 

I subsequently posted detailed info about this scenario in an entry here on Blogger at that time. The collage directly above gives a pictotial overview of the pigeon's ultimate survival, which  I just learned about yesterday (11-23-2020) and  which I'm now offering as my content for this 199th episode of my Tuesday's Truths series. 

I am most grateful to the WBF and as you may know, this bird rehab place, along with pigeons are just a couple of topics pigeons are included in my three volume book series, Words In Our Beak.

This is a photo of my three volume book series, "Words In Our Beak." Information re the books is another one of my blog  posts @ http://bit.ly/2EdADpx
MY BOOK SERIES

Thank you dear reader, for holding good thoughts re this rescued pigeon's demise and stay tuned to see if I happen to encounter him again.

Sunday, November 22, 2020

Special Time-Sensitive Offer from Fine Art America re my Images


Fine Art America, AKA FAA (the place that does my fulfillment for my art "merchandise"), offer for free shipping ends tonight, November 22nd at midnight EST. 

I have several varieties of greeting cards and a fraction of them can be seen within the images included in my poster which is atop this entry.

Some of my other greeting cards can be seen within the folllowing sequence of photos:

Thursday, November 19, 2020

Some of my photo-art is now availabe in jigsaw puzzle format!


One week ago today (11-12-2020), I announced on FB that Fine Art America (FAA) an online, print–on–demand art marketplace and fulfillment service company (who helps artists, like me, sell their images as wall art, home decor, apparel, and other lifestyle products), now have the ability to render artwork in frameable jigsaw puzzle format.

All of their packaging can be seen within my "poster" atop this entry.

Admittedly, the thumbnails may be hard to decipher, so I'm taking the liberty to show you larger images of my jigsaw puzzle's boxes.

Wednesday, November 18, 2020

"There's no place like home for the holiays...," which is a good thing, because due to COVID19 many people will stay in their living quaters, so make them cozy!


I have been away from Blogger for a week due to technical dificuilties with my computer and hope my absence has not caused my readers any inconvenience. 

But I'm back for now and hopefully longer, if all is resolved with my Mac's system.

At this time. I am grateful to annouce (albeit very last minute) Fine Art America (FAA) is offferig a one day discount (until midnight EST tonight, 11-18-2020) on my kaleidoscopic photographs which are printed on items for home decor, such as duvet covers as seen in the thumbnails affixed on the image of the poster atop this entry.

Wednesday, November 11, 2020

Colleen Elizabeth Ormond Passed Away Ten Years Ago Today (11-11-2010)

This is a photo of Colleen Elizabeth Ormond laying on a bed with her dog, Hero at her side. I don’t know the breed but I can tell you the dog is fairly small and has white fur. Colleen has red hair and is wearing a teal-colored sweater. Her left hand is resting on her chest as she looks towards the dog.  Colleen was born with with a severe form of a hydrocephalic condition which caused her to have several debilitating afflictions, including being unable to see due to resulting damage to her optic nerve.
PHOTO COURTESY OF JOYCE ORMOND

Ten years ago, on Veterans Day, November  11, 2010, Colleen Elizabeth Ormond (pictured here with the family dog, Hero), died at the age of twenty-five. I learned of her death late that night, not even a week after publishing a blog post about November being a month of remembrance for those who have died, and for those who mourn them.

Colleen was born with with a severe form of a hydrocephalic condition which caused her to have several debilitating afflictions, including being unable to see due to resulting damage to her optic nerve. 

Yet Colleen Elizabeth Ormond gave much love from the minute she came into the world until she left it, passing peacefully in her sleep on Veterans Day, having been a warrior herself. 

Colleen had fought the good fight and has now finished the race.

At that time, the family did request that in lieu of flowers to honor Colleen, donations could be made to Katibug, a non-profit foundation helping families who are caring for medically and physically fragile children like Colleen, in their homes.

Colleen's passing (and the fact that her parents and sister cared for her in their home) has always been part of my inspiration to follow through n my book project Imperfect Strangers.

The book discusses growing up with the condition of NF (Neurofibromatosis) and I've posted a video re my endeavor which can be viewed within my Vimeo channel as well as my You Tube channel.


VIEW ON VIMEO
VIEW ON YOU TUBE


The goal of my ptroject is to not only raise awareness about NF, but to educate the general public about consequences re how remarks made to an individual with any physical (or mental) difference can have a profound, long-lasting impact that last a lifetime.

Wednesday, November 4, 2020

A Lesson to Learn From Birds

This image features an adult male American robin and a young house sparrow, whose gender is probably female (too young to tell for sure as full features are not developed). They are perched on a concrete bird bath that is on the floor of my garden.  Only the rim of the birdbath and water inside of it is visible in this image. Both birds are on the right side of the image. The robin is in front of the sparrow and appears to be taking a drink as his yellow bill is reaching into the water. The little sparrow is behind him and only the bill and top portion of the head are visible.  Foliage (that is in yellowish and pale green tones ) from a Heuchera plant is behind the birds. Both these bird types are featured in my book series."Words In Our Beak." Info re the book is on my blog @ https://www.thelastleafgardener.com/2018/10/one-sheet-book-series-info.html
THESE BIRD TYPES ARE FEATURED IN WIOB

This image features an adult male American robin and a young house sparrow, whose gender is probably female (too young to tell for sure as full features are not developed). They are perched on a concrete bird bath that is on the floor of my garden. Only the rim of the birdbath and water inside of it is visible in this image. Both birds are on the right side of the image. The robin is is the furthest of the two birds to the right and he is gazing up (intently) at something (but I have no idea what ha captured his attention). The sparrow is only a few inches away from him and this little creature also seems to be looking at the same thing that caught the robin’s attention. Foliage (that is in yellowish and pale green tones ) from a Heuchera plant is behind the birds. Both these bird types are featured in my book series, “Words In Our Beak." Info re the book is on my blog @ https://www.thelastleafgardener.com/2018/10/one-sheet-book-series-info.html
THESE BIRD TYPES ARE FEATURED IN WIOB

I had two non-social distancing birds (a House sparrow and an American robin) stop by my garden the other day which surprised me as I have always heard these types of birds did not get along, so I did some research posing the question, "Do robins and sparrows get along?"

Here is what I found out: from a variety of sources. Despite their differences, sparrows and robins manage to get along pretty well. They can hang out in the same tree, they can even sit on the same branch, but the unwritten rule is to stay out of each others nest.

Not a bad thing for us humans to do during these tumultuous times of the cornavirus pandmeic and unrest due to issues associated with our 2020 preidential election in the United States.

On anothern note, dear reader, both of these bird types are featured in my three volume book series, Words In Our Beak.

This is a photo of my three volume book series, "Words In Our Beak." Information re the books is another one of my blog  posts @ http://bit.ly/2EdADpx
MY BOOK SERIES

Thursday, October 29, 2020

Fred (or Freddie), A Touring Pumpkin


It's been a very rainy (understatement) chilly day in NYC, but that didn't stop Freddie the pumpkin from continuing with his greenmarket tour.

He's been making the rounds (visiting various greenmarkets in NYC) since the first Sunday in October (when he debuted — wearing a face-mask — at the Greenmarket alongside The AMNH (American Museum of Natural History) on the UWS.

He wants people to guess his weight and whomever comes the closest will win a bag of local produce.

Contestants write their guess along with their name and contact info on a piece of paper and give it to the person monitoring his space.

And evidently, on this Saturday, which is the last Saturday in October, the winner will be annouced at the Greenmarket at Tucker Square and where I saw him today).

You would think with the array of pumpkins that are in my garden, which I've carried up five flights of stairs, that I might have an idea, but I don't, I just put down a wild guess, for you have to be in it to win it as the saying goes.

Wednesday, October 28, 2020

Goddard Riverside’s Annual Book Fair Gala Goes Virtual

PLEASE CLICK HERE TO READ MY ARTICLE

As I mentioned in my October 16th 2020 blog entry, after taking a break from writing articles for iLovetheUpperWestside article, I pitched an idea re a piece a new place (Solid State Coffee) that openned on the UWS in NYC

Since that time, I published two other articles for the aforementioned publication which were also pitched by me. 

The article being refernced here was requested by the publication and was published on 10/28/2020.

Tuesday, October 27, 2020

Tam's Demise (Tuesday's Truths WK 198)

ALT TEXT: This is a photo montage of a pigeon who fell ill and whom I rescued with someone's help. He is a pigeon fledgling. The montage is comprised of two photos. The top one shows the pigeon sitting on a tiled floor. The second one shows him in a shopping bag which was used to carry him to The Wild Bird Fund in NYC. This organization, as well as pigeons, are just two of many topics featured in my book series, "Words In Our Beak." Info re these books is on my blog @ https://www.thelastleafgardener.com/2018/10/one-sheet-book-series-info.html

Two weeks ago, with help of a colleague, I rescued a pigeon (now named Tam) in my garden on the UWS of NYC and took him to The Wildbird Fund (AKA WBF), NYC's wonderful and only bird rehab center. I subsequently posted detailed info about this scenario in an entry here on Blogger at that time. 

I ultimately found out (via Twitter) that I could follow up in ten days-two weeks time to see the status of the injured creature.

Yesterday, I did that and I am offering the folowing is a "transcript" of our exchange as my content for this week's Tuesday's Truths segement (posted below in italics):

ME: I'm not having success with DM re the pigeon I brought in on 10-14-2020. Can you PM me? Yesterday, 1:55 PM

WBF: Hi. Can you send me the name on the intake form for the Oct. 14 pigeon? Yesterday, 2:55 PM

ME: Patricia Youngquist Yesterday, 4:00 PM

WBF: Thank you. I found it on Oct. 13. This is a fledgling, very emaciated, we suspect as the result of a bacterial infection. He's in our isolation room, receiving antibiotics, anti-fungal medical and supportive care. We'll have to wait and see how he does. Thank you for helping him! Yesterday, 4:05 PM

ME: Thank you for your reply and oops you are right. I did bring the pigeon in on October 13th. I hope he pulls through. When should I check in again? I really appreciate the work you do (understatement). I am quite behind in rent and am scrambling for income but when I turn things around, I hope to be able to donate $$$ to you. Yesterday, 4:14 PM

WBF: Thank you, Patricia. Don't worry about donating. We all are suffering right now! Check back in another 2 weeks. Hopefully, there will be a more substantial update. Yesterday, 4:16 PM

Me: I will check back. Thanks again for all!

WBF: <HEART>

------------------

I am so thankful that The WBF is caring for this sweet-looking creature and I hope I will hear good news on this pigeon's status. For your information both The WBF...

... and pigeons are included in my book series, Words In Our Beak.

This is a photo of my three volume book series, "Words In Our Beak." Information re the books is another one of my blog  posts @ http://bit.ly/2EdADpx
MY BOOK SERIES

Please, dear reader, hold good thoughts for this rescued pigeon's demise and stay tuned for his progress.

Monday, October 26, 2020

It's begining to look a lot like Halloween...

his image features an array of pumpkins in the window of a supermarket. Some have faces painted on them. Others  are just plain ol' pumpkins.

Today, October 26th, is National Pumpkin Day, and in spite of the fact that the morale of many people is at a low due to consequences of the coronavirus pandemic, many are making an effort to carry on and do things to lift their spirits. 

One of the ways this is evidenced is by the fact that people are painting faces on certain pumpkins (presumably in honor of the upcoming Halloween holiday) which can be seen in the photo atop this entry.

Others (at least in the area where I live) are decorating the outside of their homes.

Sunday, October 25, 2020

Remembering The Krims

This photo features the upper portion of a 19th century prewar apartment building named La Rochelle. It is located on the UWS of NYC.

I don't want this day to pass without acknowledging the fact that eight years ago, October 25th 2012, Mr. and Mrs. Krim's two little children were murderd in their apartment which was located in the La Rochelle (on NYC's UWS).

They were killed by their nanny and I wrote about the incident on  this blog at that time.

I pass the building where the horrific event occured on countless occasions and I always think of Mr. and Mrs. Krim as well as their other little daugher who lost her siblings to that horrific crime.

Mr. and Mrs. Krim have had two more children since that time and are actively involved in a foundation set up as a way of honoring the memory of daughter (Lulu) and their son (Leo) who were killed in cold blood by their nanny.

I admire (understatement) how the Krim family has carried on with their lives and this posting is an offering of sorts to acknowedge that I also have never forgotten where I was and what I was doing on the day of 10/25/2012.

Thursday, October 22, 2020

Halloween Figurines Return to Reread Vol 2 from the "Words In Our Beak Series"

Halloween Visitors Re Read Volume Two

My Halloween visitors are back again and a few of them are rereading volume two of my book series, Words In Our Beak  (as seen in the photo atop this entry), because it has a section  that discusses safe outdoor decor for this holiday, as certain decorations can often be detrimental to birds

This holiday is ten days away (counting today) and it will be celebrated quite difffently because of the coronavirus pandemic safety regulations.

One very safe way to celebrate it with the family is to read together and Words In Our Beak Voume Two is the perfect choice.

This photo features the book-jacket cover for volume two of my book series, “Words In Our Beak.” A female cardinal, named Cam, is sitting on a table in my garden and looking straight at any viewer.  She is a bit “puffed-up” in appearance, which is something birds do to keep warm Her orange beak is one of her prominent features as it is for all members of this bird type’s gender. More information re all of this re birds is included in my books and details re each of  them are in another blog post @ https://www.thelastleafgardener.com/2018/10/one-sheet-book-series-info.html
BOOK JACKET FRONT

A picture of the pages that discuss Halloween (in relation to birds) can be seen directly below.

This photo features a couple of pages from volume two of my book series, “Words In Our Beak.”  The left portion of the image shows page 44. At the top of that page are three photos showing a partial view of NYC brownstones which are decorated for Halloween. Immediately below them and to the left are two more pictures of featuring this situation. At the bottom of the page are two rows of small photos. They all feature an array of pumpkins that have faces painting on them they could be carolers if the season had been Christmas. In this blog post I’ve been referring them  as “The Pumpkin Choir.”  Moving on to the righthand portion of this photo of two pages from “Words In Our Beak, “ there are two photos in the middle of the page (which is number 45). Both were taken in my garden. Both feature a smiling Jack-O-Lantern sitting on a white-table top. In the photo at the the “Jack” appears to be smiling at a male House finch (a bird type which is rosy red around the face and upper breast, with streaky brown back, belly and tail).   In the photo at the right, the Jack-O-Lantern appears to be smiling at a Tufted-titmouse. This bird variety is small and gray-colored. Tufted titmouses have large black eyes, small, round bill, rusty-colored flanks as well as a brushy crest.  Again, the photos seen here are from volume two of my book series, “Words In Our Beak.” The press release for this volume is on my blog @ https://www.thelastleafgardener.com/p/blog-page_10.html  Moreover, info re all three volumes of the series is on my blog @ https://www.thelastleafgardener.com/2018/10/one-sheet-book-series-info.html
PAGES 44 AND 45 WIOB V2

Moreover, two images from that segement of the book have been rendred on to greeting cards (a photo of each of the cards I am referring to can be seen in the next sequence of images...

This is a picture of a Halloween card which I designed. It features a Jack-O-Lantern sitting atop a table in my garden. This Jack is "smiling" at a male house finch. The card is available via Fine Art America. https://fineartamerica.com/featured/house-finches-trick-or-treating-patricia-youngquist.html
JACK-O-LANTERN BIRDWATCHING

This image is a screen-shot of one of my Halloween-themed notecards which is titled “The Pumpkin Choir.” The picture was taken on the Eastside of NYC in front of a brownstone which was decorated for when for Halloween. It shows an array of pumpkins that have faces painting on them they could be carolers if the season had been Christmas. A copy of this image is featured in volume two of my book series, "Words In Our Beak." Info re this series can be found on my blog @ https://www.thelastleafgardener.com/2018/10/one-sheet-book-series-info.html AND info re this particular note-card is can be found on Fine Art America @ https://fineartamerica.com/featured/the-pumpkin-choir-patricia-youngquist.html?product=greeting-card
THE PUMPKIN CHOIR NOTE-CARD

..and these cards are (along with other selections) available via Fine Art America (FAA).

Additionally, one image from this section ("The Pumpkin Choir") of voume two has been rendred on to a tote bag (also by FAA) which is available in three sizes.

This screen-shot features an orange tote/bag/pouch which has an image imprinted on it. The picture was taken on the Eastside of NYC in front of a brownstone which was decorated for when for Halloween. It shows an array of pumpkins that have faces painting on them they could be carolers if the season had been Christmas. The tote/bag/pouch is available in three sizes (13" by 13", 16" by 16" and 18" by 18") and can be purchased via Fine Art America @ https://fineartamerica.com/featured/the-pumpkin-choir-patricia-youngquist.html?product=tote-bag
THE PUMPKIN CHOIR TOTE

If these items interest you, don't delay too much dear reader, nine days will pass quickly!

Monday, October 19, 2020

Manny’s Bistro Now Open!

PLEASE CLICK HERE TO READ MY ARTICLE

As I mentioned in my October 16 2020 blog entry, after taking a break from writing articles for iLovetheUpperWestside article, I wrote a piece about a new place (Solid State Coffee) that openned on the UWS in NYC


When I was on that assignment I noticed that a nearby restaurant was opening and  I proposed (to the editor of the aforementioned publication) my doing an article about the place. He gave me the assignment. The article was published today (10/19/2020).

Saturday, October 17, 2020

Cashmere Popup Sale at Former Oxbow Tavern

PLEASE CLICK HERE TO READ MY ARTICLE

As I mentioned in yesterday's blog entry, after taking a break from writing articles for iLovetheUpperWestside article, I wrote a piece about a new place (Solid State Coffee) that openned on the UWS in NYC

When I was on that assignment I noticed that a pop up sale was occuring in a place within close proximity to Solid State Coffee, so I proposed (to the editor of the aforementioned publication) my doing an article about the event. He gave me the assignment. The article was published today (10/17/2020).

Friday, October 16, 2020

Solid State Coffee Opens on 71st Street

READ MY ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE

Aftter taking a break from writing articles for iLovetheUpperWestside article, I wrote a piece about a new place (Solid State Coffee) that openned on the UWS in NYC

Honoring Oscar Wilde


Oscar Wilde was born on this day of October 16th in the year 1854.

The quote featured within the text-based image atop this entry is attributed to him and is one I've referenced in prior blog posts where I've stated that were he alive today Wilde would likely change the quote and say, "It's very sad now days that there is so much useless information."