Search This Blog

Saturday, January 23, 2021

In the spring, becomes the geranium....

This picture is taken in a garden that is in an apartment building in NYC. The container has been wrapped in burlap for the winter and part of this material is visible in the image, as is the brick wall behind it. The focus of the image is a couple of pink colored geraniums who are poking their heads up through the mulch (which has been placed on the plant to protect the flora from winter temperatures. A few of the geranium’s green leaves are also poking up through the mulch. Garden winterizing is discussed in volume two of my three volume book series, “Words In Our Beak.” Information re these books can be found within another post on this blog @ https://www.thelastleafgardener.com/2018/10/one-sheet-book-series-info.html

When I am in my garden on a cold January day and notice few geraniums who are poking their heads through the mulch (as that flower type is doing in the photo directly above) that was put there to protect them during a cold winter days, I think of some lines from a The Rose, a song written by Amanda McBroome

Her song was made popular by Bette Midler and the lyrics I'm thinking of go like this, "...just remember in the winter, far beneath the bitter snow, lies the seed that with the sun's love, in the spring becomes the rose."

In this instance, my geraniums weren't lying beneath the bitter snow (although they were doing that last month), they are lying beneath layers of mulch put in their container when iI did my annual garden winterizing ritual.

Friday, January 22, 2021

Friday Follow Up: Miracle on the Hudson

In this picture a pair of Canadian geese are walking on the lake in Central Park which was frozen at the time I took the photo. This bird type is featured in volume two of my book series, "Words In Our Beak." Info re these books is within another post on this blog @ https://www.thelastleafgardener.com/2018/10/one-sheet-book-series-info.html
CANADIAN GEESE ARE FEATURED IN WIOB

The photo atop this entry features a pair of Canadian geese walking on a sheet of ice that is covering a lake in Central Park. I was surprised to see this happening as this bird type can often be seen trying to keep their feet warm.

Thursday, January 21, 2021

Squirrel Appreciation Day 2021

This photographic features a squirrel lying on his stomach on the branch of an Ailanthus tree. His front legs are hanging on either side of the branch. His ears are pointed straight up above his forehead and he appears to be looking straight into the camera.

his photographic features a squirrel balancing himself on a branch of an Ailanthus tree. He is staring intently at something beneath him. One of his ears is visible and it is standing straight above his forehead. A portion of his tail is dangling over another branch.

Today, January 21st, is the annual day to celebrate Squirrel Apppreciation Day. I've written about this holiday in within a number of venues including entires on this blog.

These animals can provide a lot of entertainment when you observe them as I've done in both Central Park and Riverside Park over the years when I've encountered various types including Cinnamon Variant squirrels, Black squirrels and Eastern gray squirrels.

On July 8th 2020, shortly after NYC started to begin easing up on lockdown restrictions (many of which were subsequently put back in place) which had been in effect since March due  to the devastating consequences of the coronavirus pandemic, I had the chance to watch squirrels from my window for they began to visit the Ailanthus Trees in my buildings courtyard and as you might surmise from the photo-ops atop this entry, their antics gave me many reaons to smile during those isolating times.

Wednesday, January 20, 2021

Feather by Feather

This is a picture of a Mourning dove preening. I’m not sure of the bird’s gender so I’ll refer to the creature with the he pronoun. He is doing this activity while standing atop an outdoor garden table made of marble. The surface is white. From the position he is in we can only see one eye and it is almost closed, which allows us to notice his pale blue eyelids —  a characteristic of Mourning doves. We can also see his pink feet which are a characteristic of this bird type. The feathers that he has preened are standing straight up (as shown in the left portion of the image) resembling a paper fan. Mourning doves have a story within volume one of my three volume book series. Info re these books is another post within this blog @ https://www.thelastleafgardener.com/2018/10/one-sheet-book-series-info.html

Here is another view of the Mourning dove seen in the first image (directly above this one). I’m not sure of the bird’s gender so I’ll refer to the creature with the he pronoun. He has paused from  doing the activity of preening and is still standing atop an outdoor garden table made of marble. The surface is white. From the position he is in we can only see one of his dark eyes eyes and he is staring intently at something unbeknownst to me. We can also see his pink feet which are a characteristic of this bird type. The feathers that he has preened are standing straight up (as shown in the left portion of the image) resembling a paper fan. Mourning doves have a story within volume one of my three volume book series. Info re these books is another post within this blog @ https://www.thelastleafgardener.com/2018/10/one-sheet-book-series-info.html

This is another picture of a Mourning dove preening. It is a slightly different view of the of bird referenced in the first image (two pictures above this one). I’m not sure of the bird’s gender so I’ll refer to the creature with the he pronoun. He is doing this activity while standing atop an outdoor garden table made of marble. The surface is white. From the position he is in we can only see one eye and it almost closed, which allows us to notice his pale blue eyelids —  a characteristic of Mourning doves. We can also see his pink feet which are a characteristic of this bird type. The feathers that he has preened are standing straight up (as shown in the left portion of the image) resembling a paper fan. Mourning doves have a story within volume one of my three volume book series. Info re these books is another post within this blog @ https://www.thelastleafgardener.com/2018/10/one-sheet-book-series-info.html

I've been very overwhelmed by my circumstances which have been aggravated by a number of consequences re the coronavirus pandemic. I'm now behind in every level for many of my tasks from the mundane to major projects and it's getting out of hand. 

Therefore visits to my garden by Mourning doves have become more important than ever.

Tuesday, January 19, 2021

N'tl Bird Day 2021 has come and gone! However, one can continue to celebrate! (Tuesday's Truths WK 201)

This image features a male House finch perched on the left side of a bird feeder that is shaped like house. The feeder is made of metal and is hunter-green in color. House finches are featured in volume one of my book series, "Words In Our Beak."  Info re these books is in another post on my blog @ https://www.thelastleafgardener.com/2018/10/one-sheet-book-series-info.html
MALE HOUSE FINCHES ARE FEATURED IN WIOB

This two hundred and one segement of Tuesday's Truths is to alert you to the fact that National Bird Day has come and gone for the year 2021. It was celebrated three weeks ago on 1-5. Information re this holiday can be found in a number of places on the web including a page for National Day

In bygone years, I've published posts about this occasion as I certainly appreciate any occasion that aims to raise awareness about members of the animal kingdom and I don’t think it needs to be limited to one day.

But this segement is also designed to let you know that if you missed this year’s National Bird Day, just make it a point to do something that will benefit our feathered friends, such as making sure any bird feeder you have is clean as well as replenished. 

They will truly appreciate your efforts as evidenced by this male house finch (in the photograph directly above) who is enjoying a snack from a feeder in my garden.

Another thing you can do is to make sure your bird bath is clean and if winter temperatures are prevailing, make sure the water isn't frozen.