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Wednesday, December 28, 2011

Some End of Year Posting Schedule Changes


As you may recall, from yesterday's post, Juan V and I bit the winterizing bullet and wrapped the 80+ things, which I grow in my rooftop garden. These things include herbs, vines, succulents, salad greens, grasses, plants, flowers, shrubs, trees and sedum. The wrapping of the things that I grow to preserve them through the winter is a topic I discussed (as a guest blogger) on Fern Richardson's blog, Life on the Balcony.

I will not be posting for a few days; hence the image posted above taken of a restaurant window in my neighborhood. The sign remained in the window day after day — for a couple of months — until the restaurant closed, going out of business for good. In my case, I have no intention of going out of business but I am preparing a year end review which will feature the adventures of the things that I have grown this past season. Please stay tuned.

Tuesday, December 27, 2011

GUEST POST NEWS & OF COURSE, "If it's Tuesday, it must be . . ." tumblr. Week Fourteen


Today is Tuesday so you know that it must be tumblr, and you can get there by clicking here. Meanwhile, I bit the winterizing bullet with Juan V, so this posting is a bit later than is my usual standard. Wrapping some of the smaller plants (such as this Tulipa Kaufmanniana pictured above), was like bundling up a toddler in a puffy jacket. We had over eighty containers that provide homes to my herbs, salad greens, succulents, vines, plants, flowers, grasses, shrubs as well as my trees, to prepare for their NYC seasonal winter nap, and we dressed each one in layers of bubble wrap and burlap (from on-line fabrics) before tying them with a "sash" of jute. I will post more about our antics and hopefully share some pointers later this week.

Saturday, December 24, 2011

Have yourself a . . .


Tis the day of the Eve, on TLLG, and I am wishing those who celebrate a very Merry — with this bit of cheer from one of my faves, Mutts. In between hanging your stockings by the chimney with care, you might wanna visit posts that feature this strip* that are out there!




*Please click here for a "list"of previous posts that include Mutts. AND, as for a little background on the tree (whose images you see above), it's M.R.'s first Christmas tree! And it's shining brightly with lights from yours truly who highly recommends battery operated lights when your tree is far from an electrical outlet. I referred to this "style"of lights in my December 23rd entry on nybg's (New York Botanical Garden) tumblr which you may refer to by clicking here.

Friday, December 23, 2011

Friday Follow Up: "the celebration of Festivus"


Today, Friday, is the weekday I reserve for follow-up: hence Friday Follow Up. However, today, December 23rd, is also known as Festivus Day. According to Wiki, "Festivus Day is a secular holiday celebrated on December 23 as a way to celebrate the holiday without participating in its pressures, the religious aspects, and commercialism. It was created by writer Dan O'Keefe and introduced into popular culture by his son Daniel, a screenwriter for the TV show, Seinfeld."

Because I have not had a television for quite a number of years, what I know about Seinfeld is minimal, and I certainly — until today — knew nothing about the celebration of FestivusMy Larix Kaempferi (Japanese Larch) which grows in my urban (NYC) garden is the one who told me about it.

Thursday, December 22, 2011

Winter Solstice: Think Spring!

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

Today is the winter solstice — for the year 2011 — when the days stop shortening, reverse direction and begin to grow long again. I have written about this phenomenon in the past, and if you'd like to read my thoughts on the solstice for 2010 (posted on TLLG), please click here.
As for the snowman figurine (seen in the image posted above), who spends the winter season in my succulent garden: He is armed with his watering can and a "Think Spring" sign —  you've heard of occupy Wall Street — well my little figurine is all about "occupy gardens" in the anticipation of spring . . . for after this darkest (re sunlight) day of the year passes, each day will get brighter and brighter!

Wednesday, December 21, 2011

Oh, Christmas Tree, Oh, Christmas Tree: How Good to Use Your Branches!

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11


Oh, Christmas Tree, Oh, Christmas Tree: How Good to Use Your Branches! The branches of Christmas trees make great winter blankets for an outdoor container garden.

Tuesday, December 20, 2011

"If it's Tuesday, it must be . . ." tumblr. Week Thirteen ('Twas the day before Winter . . . )




Twas the day before winter, throughout my garden on the east coast,
When the things that I grow there, began to sing AND to boast;
All of them were most excited to learn,
They'd be featured in "Life on the Balcony" —  A blog by Fern!


Today is Tuesday so you know that it must be tumblr, and you can get there by clicking here, but before you go, I'd like to share some news with you, dear reader: I have been featured as a guest blogger for Fern Richardson's blog which she calls Life on the Balcony, where I have written a three part post on Garden Winterizing.

This is why the things I grow began to sing and to boast — the next thing that they'll want is to have a toast!

I encourage you to check out Fern's blog, as there is a lot of great content there, and I am thrilled to be a part of her community! I would truly appreciate any comments you might leave on the posts I wrote for her.

Friday, December 16, 2011

Friday Follow Up: "the reindeer effect"

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

It is TGIF (Thank God It's Friday) on TLLG, and, as you undoubtedly know from a plan I posted this past October, I try to dedicate Fridays as an "opportunity" to follow-up on things which are in the news or which I have discussed, hence the clever post title, Friday Follow-Up 0-8

This past Tuesday on tumblr, (where I "send" TLLG Blog Spot followers on Tuesdays), I wrote about "the reindeer effect" in relation to a reindeer figurine, who lives in my indoor succulent garden, and I accompanied what I said with the following image of that particular reindeer.


Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

Today's post has to do with some reindeer that are new arrivals  to my urban (NYC) terrace garden, and who can be seen in the photograph at the top of today's blog entry.

Thursday, December 15, 2011

Rockin' around the Hens and Chicks!

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

The succulent known as Hens and Chicks which I grow in my urban (NYC) garden is pictured above atop a "dining table," where I often entertain guests. This particular succulent makes a great center piece which is intriguing to all — including bottles of wines, spirits and cordials — as evidenced by their fascination with the aforementioned succulent. (They even bundled up in their winter gear — and it's not even that cold today — to come out of the liquor cabinet and into my garden to see this succulent).

Wednesday, December 14, 2011

Oh, Wednesday's Wisdom, Where are you?


Today is Wednesday, a day I usually "reserve" for Wednesday's Wisdom, but I am not sure that I am feeling so wise about my personal or business related affairs today, on this Wednesday the Fourteenth of December, bringing us to the point where we only have eleven days until Christmas, when folks — if they are not already — will sing, "and so this is Christmas and what have you done? Another year over, a new one just begun . . . .", the lyrics from John Lennon's, Happy Xmas (War is Over). The song is haunting to me because I find it to be a reminder of what I have not achieved and what I've failed in doing, as described in a previous blog post on TLLG regarding this song.

Tuesday, December 13, 2011

"If it's Tuesday, it must be . . ." tumblr. Week Twelve "Nature does not hurry, yet everything is accomplished."

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

It's Tuesday, so it must be tumblr but before I  lead you there, here's a little (as usual) digression: The images posted above are of my still-flowering-in-December Tropaelum majus (Nasturtium) and White Swan Echinacea both of which I grow in my urban (NYC) terrace garden

Additionally, my Helichrysum bracteatum (Strawflowers) and the roses, from all three of the shrubs that I have of them, are still thriving. This is quite unusual for this time of year in New York City, as by now we have usually had some snow.

Monday, December 12, 2011

"Life is like eating artichokes, you have got to go through so much to get so little."

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

One of the little succulent garden figurines who came to spend time in my indoor succulent garden (a garden that I decorate for all of the seasons, which I have written about in a number of blog entries on TLLG which you may refer to by clicking here) is Lady Artichoke (seen in the image above). 

She was featured in a post on nybg's (New York Botanical Gardens) tumblr about a week ago, and in that blog entry she is seen with her comrades in the following picture which accompanies that entry.

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

I return to Lady Artichoke today because of the Tad Dorgan (Thomas Aloysius Dorgan) quote, "Life is like eating artichokes, you have got to go through so much to get so little." 

Saturday, December 10, 2011

"That's Life": Pearl Bailey's Influence on my Helichrysum bracteatum

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

The images posted above are of one of the Helichrysum bracteatum AKA Strawflowers that grow in my urban (New York City) terrace garden. They were taken on December 5th, 7th and 8th respectively. Like most of the things (80+) which I grow there, they love to sing. In fact, as you may recall, from a previous blog post (which you may read by clicking here), soon after this past Thanksgiving my Helichrysum bracteatum flowers, along with my White Swan Echinacea, were singing Cyndi Lauper's Girls Just Wanna Have Fun.

This past week, however, they were singing, "That's Life", and putting emphasis on the following lyrics:

"That's life, I can't deny it, 
I thought of quitting, 
But my heart just won't buy it. 
Cause if I didn't think it was worth a try, 
I'd have to roll myself up in a big ball and die."

Thursday, December 8, 2011

Earth laughs in flowers?

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

Even now, as we are in the first week of the end of December, in New York City, where I live and have a terrace garden, my Tropaelum majus's (Nasturtium) flowers (in the image to the right) are still going strong; and they were in a particularly whimsical mood yesterday morning (when I took this picture), inspite of the torrents of chilly rainfall that we were experiencing. 

These red and yellow flowers like my "famous" no-slave-to-fashion herb, the White Swan Echinacea, and my CoCo Chanel loving ornamental grass varieties, Ophipogon planiscapus (Black Mondo Grass), which also grow in my garden, were joking about "rules" regarding what was fashionable, what was in style, and what was passé, when the Hamatreya skirt (pictured below, image credit is here) came up in their conversation.



The Hamatreya skirt has the same name as a poem by Ralph Waldo Emerson, which has a line in it that is often (mistakenly) attributed to e.e. cummings, and the aforementioned line is this: "Earth laughs in flowers".

Wednesday, December 7, 2011

Remembering December 7th, 1941



Taking time out from blogging as well as minimizing my other activities today in exchange for moments of silence to remember those who lost their lives and their loved ones as the result of the attack on Pearl Harbor, seventy years ago today, and, also, to honor those who lost their lives and loved ones in the war that followed.

Tuesday, December 6, 2011

"If it's Tuesday, it must be . . ." tumblr. Week Eleven

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

As you know, one of my missions as The Last Leaf Gardener is to give the things I grow a voice, and I often do this by giving them the opportunity to author their own entries on TLLG. 

A few (there are many instances throughout TLLG) examples of this are entries which have been written by my Physocarpus opulifolius (Coppertina), as well as by my Helichrysum bracteatum (Strawflowers), my Ophipogon planiscapus (Black Mondo Grass), and one of my roses.

And, as you undoubedy recall, I also permit some of the objects in my terrace garden as well as some of the figurines which "live" in my indoor succulent garden to express their point of view. If you'd like to refer to the most recent blog posts on TLLG where this occurred, you may click here for the viewpoint of a terrace garden object, and here for the thoughts of Lucifer, one of my succulent garden figurines). 

But I digress. Today is all about the ram (pictured above) who is visiting my succulent garden for the holidays. He has inspired me to remind you of a passage from E.B. White's Charlotte's Web  (White is a TLLG fave please click here to see related posts.)

The ram, is a significant character in Charlotte's Web, because he is the one who tells Wilbur (the protagonist who is a lovable pig) that he is going to be killed and eaten after Christmas; this "conversation" prompted the friendship between Wilbur the pig, and Charlotte the spider. However, my little ram is not so malicious or mean spirited as the ram in White's story, and he wanted me to share a passage with you that is from Charlotte's Web.

Monday, December 5, 2011

"They sang him a ballad, and fed him on salad . . . "




Temperatures in New York City (where I live), have been pushing sixty degrees or more for the past several days, which is is quite unusual for this time of year in our area. However, today is December the Fifth, and in sixteen days it will officially be winter; hence, a good reason to include Mutts, one of my favorite comic strips, in today's blog entry with his "prophecy" regarding the inevitable "W" word which is inevitable.

Saturday, December 3, 2011

"Threescore men and threescore more . . .

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

. . . Cannot place Humpty Dumpty as he was before.


I regret there will be no posting today — don't ask why as I just may tell you. All I should say at this point, is life is more of the "all the king's horses and all the king's men unable to put (things) back together again" than it is "CTRL Z" or "EDIT/UNDO".  

Friday, December 2, 2011

Friday Follow Up




As those of you who follow my blog know, ever since October 21, 2011, I have designated Friday as a day to follow-up on topics which have been mentioned here on TLLG.

Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Wednesday's Wisdom: Anton Chekhov's Olga Seregeyevna Prozoro & me (A Repeat Broadcast)


Today's blog entry is a "rebroadcast' of what I said last year on November the Thirtieth, where the same photograph you see here was included. It is a poignant day for me, which — if you care to — you may read about by clicking here.

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

"If it's Tuesday, it must be . . ." tumblr. Week Ten

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

Another Tuesday has arrived, and yes, if it's Tuesday at TLLG, it must be tumblr, but before I send you there, I'll remind you that it is also the last Tuesday in November! 

You certainly would not surmise that it is this late in the calendar year from the happenings in my urban (NYC) terrace garden, as evidenced by the photograph of my Helichrysum bracteatum AKA Strawflowers, above (which I took yesterday).

Monday, November 28, 2011

Monday's Musings: The Monday after Thanksgiving, A Post "Rebroadcasted'


Some radio programs on NPR's WNYC rebroadcasted some of their former segments on Thanksgiving, and today I am following their example, as I am making this blog entry a "rebroadcast' of what I said last year on the Monday after Thanksgiving, where the same photograph you see here was included. It is a poignant day for me, which — if you care to — may read about by clicking here

Saturday, November 26, 2011

"If you obey all the rules you miss all the fun." OR "Flowers, they just wanna have fun. . . "

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

Today is the last Saturday in November, and twenty-three days (including today) have passed since I "featured" Thomas Hood's poem in a blog entry on TLLG, about the "NO" in November which I'll post here again:

No sun - no moon!
No morn - no noon -
No dawn - no dusk - no proper time of day.
No warmth, no cheerfulness, no healthful ease,
No comfortable feel in any member -
No shade, no shine, no butterflies, no bees,
No fruits, no flowers, no leaves, no birds -
November!

The reason I've returned to this poem is that, fortunately, most of my fun loving things that I grow in my urban (New York City) terrace garden apparently decided to consider Katharine Hepburn's quote, "If you obey all the rules you miss all the fun", and to stick around for at least the duration of November, therefore defying the "no flowers" norm (and perhaps an unwritten "rule") Hood cites in his aforementioned poem.

Friday, November 25, 2011

Friday Follow Up: BLUE Friday?



Today, the day after Thanksgiving, is referred to as "Black Friday", as most of you undoubtedly know. I find the whole concept to be rather disheartening, I am even toying with calling it Blue Friday, as I do find it somewhat sad — particularly this year — because stores from coast to coast, across the entire United States, opened at 9:00 PM on Thanksgiving night, to get a jump on Black Friday, when stores usually open at 4:00 AM or thereabouts.

Thursday, November 24, 2011

Happy Thanksgiving!

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11
Image From my Urban (NYC) Terrace Garden
AS SEEN ON TLLG 11-18-10
As for my impressions on Thanksgiving, I am a bit at a loss as to how they belong in today's entry on TLLG. I have been severely bitten by the nearly poisonous "branding bug" — the how does it relate to you and what you do sort of bug —  and it has been somewhat detrimental in terms of my "normal" creative work flow. Besides this, as a blogger, writer and conversationalist, yours truly is not a fan of the "I" pronoun, for I (there it is already) am not someone whose comings and goings matter to the cyber-space world in terms of what I am doing or not doing on Thanksgiving — or any other day for that matter — as say Angelina Jolie, Demi Moore, Martha Stewart, or even some bloggers with a lot of followers are.

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Wednesday's Wisdom: "Ladies and Yams "


Like my "friend" Dagwood (whom I have referred to in previous blog entries on TLLG that you may refer to by clicking here as well as here and here and here), I have a hard time concentrating around the Thanksgiving holidays, but my reasoning is not because of the food that's involved as I actually don't like Thanksgiving fare: I don't eat meat, and the other traditional foods honoring the day are too heavy for my tastes; however, my food preferences are neither here nor there as far as this blog goes.

The distractions I "suffer" from during this time of year are involved in my attempts to hang on to the present moment, and just as Dagwood is "somewhere else" when he "should" be present for his meeting, I, too find myself somewhere else mentally other than where I am physically.

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

"If it's Tuesday, it must be . . ." tumblr. Week Nine


Today is Tuesday, and yes, I have said, if it's Tuesday it must be tumblr (and it still is a tumblr day), but before I send you there, please let me digress a bit, as it is also the Tuesday before Thanksgiving, a time when many children are making line drawings in school — using their hand as a pattern — such as the one by yours truly posted above today's blog entry. Additionally, it is also November the 22nd, a day which changed the lives of many — in 1963 — when President John F. Kennedy (JFK) was assassinated. I wrote about what I was doing on that fateful day in a blog entry this past November (2010), and if you would like to refer to it, you may do so by clicking here.

However, as I stated yesterday, TLLG is not a political or social justice blog (there are plenty of good ones about those topics out in cyberspace), but, be that as it may, I do want to acknowledge Caroline Kennedy today. Forty-eight years ago on this day, November the 22nd 1963, when Caroline Kennedy was five days shy of turning six years old, there is a possibility, that she, too, was creating line drawings like the one I have just described, whimsical and carefree in structure and fun to create for Thanksgiving.

Unfortunately, by the afternoon any whimsicalness she might have felt was obviously shattered. For by that hour, she had not only suffered the death of her newly born sibling, Patrick , who had died that past August, but her father, President John F. Kennedy, had been assassinated; and surely she must replay these events in her mind on this day, especially when the media will replay and replay the event that occurred in Dallas.

I do not keep tabs on what Caroline Kennedy does or does not do; as I am one of those — to quote Herb Gardner – who has "given up on the (21st) century in favor of making it through the week."*

Rather, Ms. Kennedy is on my mind today because, like her, I was a child when J.F.K. was assassinated (Caroline is my sister's age), and the impact of the tragedy, and of any tragedy or trauma on a child, forever shapes their view of the world. From what I observe, Ms. Kennedy does not seem to be burdened with her past scars as others (including yours truly) tend to be. But, before I get too philosophical or begin to sound presumptuous (after all I have nothing in common with Caroline Kennedy except that we both live in New York City, work as writers, and were children when her father was assassinated), I'll leave my thoughts on Caroline Kennedy for you to mull over, as I am certain you have your own ideas and perceptions, which you are always welcome to share with me within the comments field at the end of this blog.

P.S. *The quote is from Herb Gardener's play, I'm Not Rappaport, and I referred to Mr. Gardener at the onset of this blog in a post you may access via this link.

AND WITHOUT, FURTHER ADO, SINCE IT IS TUESDAY AND IT MUST BE TUMBLR, PLEASE CLICK HERETO GO THERE!

Monday, November 21, 2011

Monday's Musings: "The frog does not drink up the pond in which he lives."

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

It's Monday, Monday November the Twenty-First, which means it has been one month since I made an "official" announcement on TLLG about my plan to include — what had been an occasional feature — on this blog and that is dedicating Mondays on TLLG to Monday Musings. It has also been sixteen days since Lucifer, my rhinestone frog, left my indoor succulent garden for his annual hiatus (and when my Indian figurines came for their annual short visit to my succulent garden as evidenced in the collage posted above). Lucifer's departure is a fact, dear reader, that you may recall from a previous post on TLLG,  titled, Time is fun when you are having flies.

Additionally, it is the Monday before Thanksgiving, a time when most people are filled with recollections and musings of some sort, including mixed feelings about the day itself, that are often related to memories of bygone days of celebration with family. And of course, it is a time that can be filled with regret about our forefathers in relation to the Indians and the land in America.

Saturday, November 19, 2011

"But I was thinking of a plan to dye one's whiskers green . . .

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

. . . And always use so dark a fan
That they could not be seen . . ,"

The flowers on my Lavandula angustifolia (English Lavender), an herb which grows in my urban (New York City) terrace garden, have turned a brilliant indigo, as evidenced in the photograph above today's blog entry. My English Lavender is so pleased by this brilliant color that it seemed he wanted to befriend one of the grasses in my garden, and so he stretched his arms waaaaaaaaaaaaaaay out so they nearly touched the delicate flowers that are still growing on my exquisite Hakanechola Macra AKA Japanese Forest Grass All Gold, which is the ornamental grass featured in the right hand corner of the image posted above. As my normally mild mannered Lavandula angustifolia tried to touch the tips of my Hakanechola Macra, I heard him recite, "But I was thinking of a plan to dye one's whiskers green. And always use so dark a fan That they could not be seen."

Friday, November 18, 2011

Friday Follow Up: The Ophipogon planiscapus Returns with a Reminder

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11
Ta da! It's me again, one of the Ophipogon planiscapus AKA Black Mondo Grass triplets that grows in Patricia Youngquist's (AKA The Last  Leaf Gardener) urban garden in New York City.

I sm someone you may remember from this past Wednesday's blog post on TLLG where, for the most part, I was the spokes-plant for that blog entry, and if you would like to refer to it, you may do so by clicking here.

In any event, the reason I "opened" today's blog post entry, by saying "Ta da!," is that I am thrilled to have been asked again — and so soon at that — to author a post! I love being a spokes-plant, however Youngquist has warned me that readers like brief posts, so I'll do as she says, and not as she, herself always does.

Thursday, November 17, 2011

Light thickens, and the crow . . .

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

. . . Makes wings to th' rocky wood.
Good things of day begin to drop and drowze;
Whiles night's black agents to their prey do rouse.
Thou marvel'st at my words; but hold thee still.
Things bad begun make strong themselves by ill.
So, prithee, go with me."

Claudia, the crow, pictured at the top of today's blog entry has recently joined my indoor succulent garden, and I overheard her reciting a speech from William Shakespeare'sMacbeth. The speech she was delivering comes from Act Three, Scene Two and is posted here (above) in orange text.

Wednesday, November 16, 2011

Wednesday's Wisdom: " . . . black has it all. White too. Their beauty is absolute. It is perfect harmony."

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

Today's LLG blog segment on Wednesday's Wisdom, is being authored by a guest blogger, who happens to be my prolific Ophipprolificogon planiscapus AKA Black Mondo Grass, featured in a photograph that I took of him yesterday in my urban (New York City) terrace garden, and this image can be found in the top lefthand corner of today's blog entry. 

The Ophipprolificogon planiscapus shown here is one of the three of the Black Mondo Grass triplets, which I have had for many years in my garden, and he is the most vocal of the three. Therefore, he wanted to voice his opinion regarding something that I posted both on nybg's (New York Botanical Garden) tumblr page as well as TLLG's Facebook Page. (He will get into that later.)

For now, it is sufficient to say that my Black Mondo grass is no stranger to voicing his views on the Internet.

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

In any event, since today's LLG post has the distinction of being authored by my eager-to-weigh in Ophipprolificogon planiscapus, please allow mewithout further ado, to hand my keyboard over to him.

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

"If it's Tuesday, it must be . . ." tumblr. Week Eight

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

Today is November the Fifteenth, meaning we have already come to the midpoint in the month of November for the year 2011. November, a month known to be a months of "no's" for the humorist/poet Thomas Hood — which I discussed at the onset of the month in a blog entry on TLLG titled, "the No in November", which you may read by clicking here — has been a month of "yeses" in terms of the colors in my urban (New York City) garden.

Monday, November 14, 2011

Monday's Musings: Bon Anniversaire to you Claude Monet! Joyeux Anniversaire to You!


Today's blog post is in honor of Claude Monet, the founder of French Impressionist painting, who was born one hundred and seventy one years ago today, in 1840, on November the 14th. 

Monet is known to have said, "I perhaps owe becoming a painter to flowers." 

As you undoubtedly know, dear reader, one of the many flowers that Monet painted was the flower of the Tropaelum majus AKA Nasturtium Plant.

One of those paintings is, Nasturtiums In A Blue Vase, shown in an image credited with the following linkin the top lefthand corner of this blog entry.

Saturday, November 12, 2011

My Physocarpus opulifolius Poses a Question for TLLG Blog Readers


The comic strip posted above today's blog entry, as you may recognize, dear reader, is from Blondie. For, as you may recall, various "segments" of Blondie have appeared within this blog in previous posts that you may refer to by clicking here as well here and here. Meanwhile, the strip posted at the top of today's entry was at the suggestion of my Physocarpus opulifolius AKA Coppertina Tree.

Friday, November 11, 2011

"There is no blue without yellow and orange." Insights & Controversy Regarding the Color Yellow PART THREE


And now . . . continued from
 Part One and Part Two of 11-11-11 post:

Therefore, on the authority of my beloved Tropaelum majusthey were nearly inconsolable when they heard the yellow quote, and their sadness resulted in some of the yellow things which grow in my rooftop garden such as my Helichrysum bracteatum AKA Strawflowers and one of my Rose Shrubs, pictured below (respectively in images taken on this past Thursday morning just after all the "yellow-rhetoric" of the things which grow in my garden had occurred), to go on the Internet, searching for other artists who fully appreciated the color yellow, and that is when they found one of Vincent van Gogh's quotes about yellow, which is "How wonderful yellow is. It stands for the sun."

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

It is not surprising to me that my Helichrysum bracteatum or my yellow rose expressed their concern (by looking for a LIKE "yellow" quotation) over my Actinida kolomikta, Actimida and Hakanechola Macra feeling slighted over the quotation attributed to Degas regarding yellow, for they are not shy about standing up for themselves — or others — as evidenced in the blog posts that each of them have authored. To refer to my Helichrysum bracteatum's blog entry on TLLG, please click here and to refer to the blog post my yellow rose authored on TLLG, please click here

My yellow rose has been quite the little activist lately; remember how miffed she was at New York Botanical Gardens for their "eye-candy reference"? If you have not had a chance to "hear" her point of view on that, click here  to see the blog entry on TLLG where her "friend" the yellow Tropaelum majus (Nasturtiumhas been included; and you may also, by clicking here, see what she posted on facebook about the New York Botanical Gardens still using "eye-candy" to describe flowers.