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Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Cinco de Mayo in Bygone Years & 5/5/2020 (Tuesday's Truths WK 178)


It's Cinco de Mayo and I'm recalling a time the holiday fell ion the first Sunday in May, which coincided the Five Boro Bike Tour, an event I referenced in this past Sunday's entry here on Blogger. At that particular time, I celebrated completing another bike tour with a margarita at a place in my hood (which can be seen in the photo directly above).

This year because of the somberness due to the COVID-19 (coronavirus)  pandemic, I  don't think there was much (if anything) mentioned about the holiday which is normally a festive one in my hood as we have a number of Mexican Restraunts (which are closed due to NYC's shutdowns).

However, the festive #ClapBecauseWeCare session still took place in my area (as evidenced in the pictures below).

GIUSEPPE AND TERESA
(He has taken a video of a session from his window.)

A #CLAPBECAUSEWECAREPARTICIPANT
JULIE, THE WOMAN WHO TOOK PHOTO-OP S OF MY GARDEN
SEE THEM BY CLICKING HERE AND HERE 
A #CLAPBECAUSEWECAREPARTICIPANT
A #CLAPBECAUSEWECAREPARTICIPANT

During my participation I gave it my all for the first responders, health care professionals as well as essential workers, who are putting their lives at risk to keep us safe during this pandemic.

My thoughts were also on my brother (JM) in law (who lives in Illinois).

He can be seen in the next image which was taken years ago when he visited NYC with my next youngest sister which is the first and only time I've seen him (although we have talked by phone during all the years that followed).


JM is considered an essential worker because he is an electrician. He has been putting himself in harms way by continuing to work during this crisis.

For several days he has not been well, so the other day he was advised to go to an Emergency Room, where thankfully it was determined his lungs are clear , but the administered a COVID-19 test. He will know the results in five days from the publication of this Blogger entry.

Admittedly, this is a hard time for many throughout the world (understatement). Preventing the spread of COVID-19 is on most people’s minds these days and so is the desire to do something to show appreciation for the work being done by health care professionals, first responders and essential workers.

It has recently been noted that the importance of wearing a face-mask cannot be stressed enough as a means a to prevent one person from inadvertently spreading the coronavirus to another.

Additionally it has been made clear that wearing a mask is the least a person can do to show their appreciation for health care professionals, first responders and essential workers.

But the effect of one seeing so many people wearing masks has already had a profound psychological impact on many persons; therefore when Fine Art America (FAA) recently informed me that it had added the ability to imprint my images on cloth face-masks designed for everyday use when out in public through its sister site, pixels.com, I was thrilled at the prospect of being able to have this done.

With so many people wearing face-masks, I started to think what it must be like for babies, toddlers, and older children — or residents of assisted living and nursing home facilities cut off from visits by family and friends — to be looking into the faces of adults wearing a “clinical–looking” mask. How frightening and confusing that must be for them! I hope that seeing my images imprinted on face masks makes the world a lot more cheerful for them.

I have joined with fellow FAA artists by selecting four of my images to be used with face-masks and now have (as of this announcement) created four varieties of masks and they can be seen in the next set of images which are available via Fine Art America.

AVAILABLE VIA FINE ART AMERICA
AVAILABLE VIA FINE ART AMERICA
AVAILABLE VIA FINE ART AMERICA
AVAILABLE VIA FINE ART AMERICA


These masks are based on images I have on Fine Art America  within my  my Black and White Photo Collection, as well as my Dragonfly Collection, and my Kaleidoscopic collection and also of an image from one of my bird imge collections). Each mask, made from 100% polyester, is one-size-fits-all using two woven, elastic loops to secure it around the ears. When purchasing, be sure to read the full description on the product page.

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