Monday, January 2, 2017

Christmas's Ninth Day




It's the ninth day of Christmas! And, if you are familiar with the song known as The Twelve Days Of Christmas, dear reader, then you probably recall that on the ninth day of Christmas, someone's true love gave to them these gifts: nine drummer's drumming, eight maids-a-milking, seven swans a swimming, six geese a laying, five golden rings, four birds a calling (or a colling or a coaling), as well as the gifts of three french hens, two turtle doves, and a partridge in a pear tree.

As I mentioned in a recent posting here on Blogger, John R. Henderson, has studied the meaning behind the lyrics to the twelve days song, and has posted his findings on a web-page which he has titled the 12 Birds of Christmas. Here's what Henderson points out the giving of nine drummers drumming on this ninth day of Christmas:

"With this verse, the order of the gifts we sing is changed from the original. Instead of ladies dancing, in the earliest known version, on this day drummers were drumming. In England and mainland Europe, the most common drumming bird was the Snipe. Where and when snipes do their drumming is important. Snipes drum in the spring soon after fields have been plowed and are most fertile. The number nine represents harmony and eternity. Fertility coupled with both harmony and eternity creates the most powerful force we can know."

At this time, I don't recall ever seeing a bird type known as a Snipe! Be that as it may, Mr. Henderson's ideas have truly given me something to keep in mind if I ever happen to see a Snipe, which isn't likely in NYC, where I live.

Therefore for purposes of this posting, the gift of nine drummers drumming on this ninth day of Christmas, will have to be represented by the drummer figurine seen in the photos atop this blog posting. The first image is a solo photo-op of him, and the second image features him playing with other members of his orchestra. As you can see he, as well as his fellow musicians, are made up from re-purposed parts of Christmas trees. And while I don't have nine drummers drumming, I do have another drummer in my home at this time.
He can be seen in the following photograph, towards the right-hand portion of the image.


In actuality, he is not known as a drummer drumming, but. as The Little Drummer Boy, and he is someone you might recognize from a post on hometalk.

Be that as it may, these are the only drummers drumming in my home on this first Monday of the new year and the ninth day of Christmas! In any case, The Drummer Boy as well as a few of the figurines surrounding him, came from More & More Antiques, the shop in Manhattan's UWS which is selling my fauna-flora-insect-themed postcards.

Steve Mohr, the sole proprietor of this shop is enthusiastic about my collection and at his suggestion, I may offer my cards in boxed-sets in the coming year! I've already created promo cards that feature thumb-nails of each of my postcards! They can be seen in the following pictures.



Steve is currently carrying each type of my postcards, and each type of them have also been given to the Bartow-Pell Mansion Museum (at their request) on a consignment basis.

Moreover, the gift shop at The Raptor Trust (a bird rehab facility in new Jersey), is currently carrying my fauna-themed postcards.

Meanwhile, all of these postcards can also be viewed within a prior post here on Blogger; as well as within a store-front page on my web-site, patriciayoungquist.com.

Every image within my postcard collection is from the iBook and ePub version of Cam's book, Words In Our Beak, Volume One.



All of these postcards, as well as the book, Words In Our Beak, Volume One, make great gifts to offer to friends and family throughout the new year and beyond!

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