Monday, August 20, 2012

Monday's (Garden) Madness! GRRRRR and GREAT


According to Holiday Insights, today, August 20th, is National Radio Day, and besides the fact that I enjoy listening to the radio as opposed to watching television (I've not had a TV since the 1980's), I want to honor this "holiday" by once again thanking radio announcers who have interviewed me about how my legal blindness has affected my work as a photo-artist. (My only other involvement with media associated with radio was as a film extra in Woody Allen's Radio Days.)
My first radio interview about how my being legally blind impacted my photographic work was with John Montone, of 1010 WiNS, who, at the time of my interview, had a week-end "magazine" series in which the station featured Montone's interview with a given person and the station played segments of it throughout a given week-end. The program was called, John Montone's New York, and the segments in which John featured me were called, It Takes A Sharp Eye! Or Does It? Meet Patricia Youngquist on John Montone's New York!

I wrote about this interview in one of my very first posts (in January of 2010), here on Blogger; and if you want to read about it you may do so by clicking here. Moreover, if you care to hear the interview, it has been posted on my web-site Patricia Youngquist Photo Art, and you are able to listen to it by clicking here.


The second radio interview I was given (also to discuss how my legal blindness affected my work as a photo-artist), occurred with Karen Ingenthron Lewis, who interviewed me for W.B.A.I.'s program, The Al Lewis Show. This interview was also discussed in the aforementioned January 2010 Blogger post, and, once again, if you'd like to read that entry, you may do so by clicking here. As with my interview with John Montone, my interview with Karen Ingenthron Lewis is posted on my web-site, and the link to listen to this is here.


Or, if you prefer to see an image whilst the interview is taking place, both interviews can be found in the Media Gallery on my indiegogo Campaign, a Campaign where my mission is to "give voice to things that live in a garden." The interviews will be posted there for the duration of my Campaign which ends in sixty-one days!


And, with this mini recognition of National Radio Day and my acknowledgment of my enjoyment of the radio (don't tell Ira Glass as I cannot as of yet afford to support his station), I'm now returning to my "regularly scheduled programing" and I am picking up where I left off here on Blogger on August 17th 2012, when I posted in the morning before Juan V came to work with me in my garden.


Although my garden may look lush in the aerial view that can be seen at the top of today's blog entry and is an image which Juan V took this past Friday (after I had done my morning posting here on Blogger), many of the things which live in my garden are struggling, and I have put added few markings to the image to indicate where the suffering is taking place the most!



For on August 17th, Juan V and I discovered that my Physocarpus opulifolius AKA Coppertina (which can be seen within the circle that I've added to Juan's image) had suddenly gotten very sick; due to humidity issues in my garden. The Coppertina is in the far left corner of this image and nearly 1/2 of it is gone and this trauma literally happened overnight which, is quite distressing! As you may know, my Coppertina is quite prolific; and he even "authored" blog entries on TLLG's Blogger Pages, including one which may be found by clicking here.

Moreover, my roses are in trouble too! They are beginning to have issues with rust and black spots, which are also related to some humidity issues in my garden, and I've added an arrow to Juan V's aerial image to indicate where one of the troubled rose bushes is located. Since I can't suck the humidity out of the air, and my terrace never seems to dry out, and it continues to hold too much moisture, I may have to put a fan outside on occasion to help dry it out; however, I am nor sure how feasible that is.

A consolation in my garden is that house finches and mourning doves continue to visit it as evidenced by the images posted below:


Words In Our Beak’s goal is to open readers to a simple understanding of the winged world and their environment. Set in a rooftop urban garden in New York City, my story is told in the voice of Cam, a female cardinal, who visits it. Words In Our Beak is directed to children and adults who are curious about birds, and want to learn about them from a unique perspective. The book includes hundreds of images of flora and fauna, links to movies, as well as to informative narratives that have been created by the author.  Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11
Male House Finch Mugs for Camera in my Terrace Garden!
Words In Our Beak’s goal is to open readers to a simple understanding of the winged world and their environment. Set in a rooftop urban garden in New York City, my story is told in the voice of Cam, a female cardinal, who visits it. Words In Our Beak is directed to children and adults who are curious about birds, and want to learn about them from a unique perspective. The book includes hundreds of images of flora and fauna, links to movies, as well as to informative narratives that have been created by the author.  Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11
Ol' Blue Eyes Mourning Dove Waddles in my Terrace Garden!
Words In Our Beak’s goal is to open readers to a simple understanding of the winged world and their environment. Set in a rooftop urban garden in New York City, my story is told in the voice of Cam, a female cardinal, who visits it. Words In Our Beak is directed to children and adults who are curious about birds, and want to learn about them from a unique perspective. The book includes hundreds of images of flora and fauna, links to movies, as well as to informative narratives that have been created by the author.  Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11
Female House Finch Comin' in For A Landing atop TLLG's String Lights!

Moreover, I have been able to capture some of their antics on camera as indicated by the number of photographs I've posted of them on TLLG's Facebook Page and Pinterest Board for birds. Moreover, I've provided a few narratives (with photo-ops) about the visiting finches here on Blogger, which may be referred to by clicking here, and you may view a Virtual Story (garden themed movie) which I produced for them and titled, Meet the Finches (Book One) and is featured in my Vimeo Library.

Additionally, I've created other narratives about these amazing finches as well as my visiting mourning doves which are posted on TLLG's tumblr pages. To view them, please click here, and put either the word finches or mourning doves in the search engine to read the entries. The search engine for tumblr is located at the bottom of the their pages.

As for the lone gal cardinal who had been visiting my garden and "allowed" me to photograph her for a Virtual Story that I titled, Words in my Beak! Book One, and then flew the "coop," which I discussed in a previous post, it appears she has returned, as seen in the image below taken this past Saturday in my terrace garden.


Words In Our Beak’s goal is to open readers to a simple understanding of the winged world and their environment. Set in a rooftop urban garden in New York City, my story is told in the voice of Cam, a female cardinal, who visits it. Words In Our Beak is directed to children and adults who are curious about birds, and want to learn about them from a unique perspective. The book includes hundreds of images of flora and fauna, links to movies, as well as to informative narratives that have been created by the author.  Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

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