Friday, November 18, 2011

Friday Follow Up: The Ophipogon planiscapus Returns with a Reminder

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11
Ta da! It's me again, one of the Ophipogon planiscapus AKA Black Mondo Grass triplets that grows in Patricia Youngquist's (AKA The Last  Leaf Gardener) urban garden in New York City.

I sm someone you may remember from this past Wednesday's blog post on TLLG where, for the most part, I was the spokes-plant for that blog entry, and if you would like to refer to it, you may do so by clicking here.

In any event, the reason I "opened" today's blog post entry, by saying "Ta da!," is that I am thrilled to have been asked again — and so soon at that — to author a post! I love being a spokes-plant, however Youngquist has warned me that readers like brief posts, so I'll do as she says, and not as she, herself always does.


I will try to get right to the point. Since I am aware that today is Friday, and TLLG has been designating Fridays for "Follow-up Friday" segments, there are two things I want to follow up on. First of all, this past Wednesday, I mentioned that us Ophipogon planiscapus buddies (we are triplets as you may recall) live under the "canopy" or "protective arms"  of the vines known as Actinida kolomikta and Actimida (Kiwi Vines), who have been the subject of a number of posts on TLLG which you may refer to by going to the Labels Menu on the left side of this blog entry, and clicking on Actinida kolomikta and Actimida (Kiwi Vines).

And as you may recall, the Actinida kolomikta and Actimida, are also the co-stars of Youngquist's first garden-themed movie (Virtual Story called "The Kiwi Speaks! Fifteen Minutes of Fame . . . almost", which is now on Vimeo, and you may access it by clicking here.

Be that as it may, i am not here today to discuss the Kiwis' movie; rather, I am here to follow-up on what I said about us Black Mondo triplets' circumstances yesterday. As you may recall, I mentioned that we – the Black Mondo triplets are usually hidden under the Actinida kolomikta and Actimida's "canopy" or "protective arms"  as the Kiwis' call it, and I even included photographs in that post to support my point of how the Kiwis' leaves hide us; well, dear reader, I am here today to say that before twenty-four hours had passed of my clicking on "publish this post," big gusts of wind blew which knocked off all the leaves of the aforementioned Actinida kolomikta and Actimida, and now we Black Mondo triplets don't have to compete for the spotlight, as evidenced by the photograph below, showing us under the now bare Actinida kolomikta and Actimida which had been so lush with leaves.



It happens during November — the falling of leaves — as you undoubtedly know,  and this brings me to the second point I want to make while I have the chance to be a spokes-plant again, which is this: today is already November the 18th, meaning that there are twelve days left of this month, and so in this follow-up, I am also recalling a blog entry which Youngquist made at the very beginning of this month in which she stated (in relation to leaves in general), "These beautiful leaves will soon be falling, and therefore it is essential that I heed the advice offered in Elizabeth Lawrence's quote: 'Even if something is left undone, everyone must take time to sit still and watch the leaves turn.'"

With Thanksgiving — and all the preparation (emotionally and physically) that is involved — being less than a week away, it might be hard to do as Lawernce suggests in her aforementioned quote and, ". . . take time to sit still and watch the leaves turn," but it is essential for mental and physical health. It is not easy for me, a Black Mondo triplet, to do this either — even in the beautiful garden where I make my home. I confess that I often fail to even notice the changing leaves of the Rubus calycinoides (Ornamental Raspberry), a beautiful vine as evidenced of the photograph of it pictured below,

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11


Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

And with these thoughts, dear reader, I'll close for the day. so you and I can go watch some leaves turn; but, before I sign off, I encourage you to say, "there are still twelve days of November;" instead of, "I can't believe that November is almost over, because it isn't; there is still time to watch some leaves change color!

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