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Saturday, February 3, 2018

Feed the Birds Day 2018



I've posted a You Tube video atop this entry in honor of one of today's (February 3rd) holidays, which  is known as Feed the Birds Day (according to Holiday Insights who states the following):

"Date When Celebrated: Always February 3: Help the wild birds in your backyard to survive the long, cold winter by feeding them. That's exactly why this special day was created. Mid and late winter are especially hard on all outdoor animals. By mid winter, food sources become scarcer and scarcer for the wild birds that over-winter in your backyard..."

I featured this quote from Holiday Insights along with the Mary Poppins film clip that's included here in my 2017 blog entry for Feed the Birds Day,

In terms of the many photographs of wild birds eating that I used in the aforementioned entry, most of them are different than the ones I am using today.

There is not much new I have to offer in terms of information re the importance of feeding wild birds at this time of year, so in terms of viewing this particular entry, may I suggest you listen to the song as you view my images of different birds eating; and then after doing this, — if you are so inclined — go outside and FEED THE BIRDS!

CARDINALS NOSHING IN MY URBAN GARDEN
(from a tray, a cylinder-feeder, a "House Feeder," and a "Wreath Feeder"):





HOUSE FINCHES NOSHING IN MY URBAN GARDEN
(from a "House Feeder"):



MOURNING DOVE NOSHING IN MY URBAN GARDEN
(from a tray):



BLUEJAYS NOSHING IN MY URBAN GARDEN
(from a "tall house feeder," a "Wreath Feeder," and from a bowl):







HOUSE SPARROWS NOSHING
(from a ledge that surrounds my urban garden and from my "House Feeder"):



TUFTED TIT MOUSE ABOUT TO NOSH IN MY URBAN GARDEN
(from a "fauna house feeder"):



A LONE DARK-EYED JUNCO NOSHING ON THE LEDGE OF MY URBAN GARDEN:


A LONE CHICKADEE NOSHING IN MY URBAN GARDEN
(from different styles of tube-feeders):




DOWNY WOODPECKER NOSHING IN MY URBAN GARDEN
(from my "Wreath Feeder" and one of my suet-baskets):



COMMON GRACKLE NOSHING IN MY URBAN GARDEN:
(from one of my bowls, as well as my "Wreath Feeder," and one of my suet-baskets):




WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH NOSHING
(from a ledge surrounding my urban garden, as well as my "Wreath Feeder"):



ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK NOSHING
(from a saucer that's on a ledge of my urban garden):


PIGEONS NOSHING IN MY URBAN GARDEN
(from my suet-bud as well as my "Wreath Feeder"):




EMILY, A BALTIMORE ORIOLE, NOSHING IN MY URBAN GARDEN
(from my suet-bud feeder):


EUROPEAN STARLINGS NOSHING ON FRUIT IN MY URBAN GARDEN
(from my saucer feeders, as well as my hanging petri-dish):





HARPER, a NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD NOSHING ON FRUIT IN MY URBAN GARDEN
(from my one of my saucer feeders as well as a make-shift dish):



AN AMERICAN GOLDFINCH NOSHING IN MY URBAN GARDEN
(from my "House Feeder"):


AMERICAN ROBINS NOSHING IN MY URBAN GARDEN AND ON ITS LEGDE
(from my make-shift feeders):




A LONE LEUTISTIC HOUSE FINCH NOSHING IN MY URBAN GARDEN
(from my "House Feeder"):


And, last, as of this posting re birds who've I've observed noshing in my place, is the bird type known as a lone American kestrel. However, his/her intent wasn't on what I offer in my feeders, rather, it was on an unfortunate roof-rat, which was unpleasant to witness (as evidenced in the image below), but part of nature's chain.


Be that as it may, dear reader, I hope you get a chance to participate in this Feed the Birds Day, and that you don't limit your doing so to today.

If you don't have a garden or outdoor space, consider the birds who spend time in your local parks, public spaces, or at your beaches. They can use your help too, if the authorities permit feeding them.

Meanwhile, Feed the Birds Day is a good opportunity to feed yourself with information about the avian community. Here's one way you can do this: As some of you know, Cam (the female cardinal featured in the first bird image within this entry) is a spokes-bird for the avian community, and she has written a book about her feathered comrades. A photo of the hardcover version of her book, Words In Our Beak Volume One can be seen in the next image.


Words In Our Beak Volume One (WIOB V1) has received rave reviews, including the following (which is posted on Amazon and written by the writer/musician/teacher, Joan Budilovsky).

"If you are not yet a bird-lover, you will be after reading this book. Words in our Beak is so enchanting as it follows a little cardinal named, Cam, through the rooftops of NYC and beyond. Cam has so much to share from a bird's eye perspective, it was hard to put the book down. I became enveloped in Cam's world by imagining what it is like to live on a rooftop, choose the right flowers to eat, and listen to the world around in the most intimate, gentle and fascinating ways. Thank you, Cam! I hope to read ever more of your travels in the new year!"

Cam's story is accompanied by over one hundred pictures that feature flora, insects, points of interest in NYC; and of course, members of the avian community.

The book is available in a few formats and the following information will direct you as to how to buy  the versions of  WIOB V1 which best suits you.

HARDCOVER:
Book Seller Info: http://bit.ly/2AFZDCz
Barnes & Noble On-Line: http://bit.ly/2AAnB26
book culture Columbus (a bookstore on the UWS in NYC): http://bit.ly/2FsC1Uf

SOFTCOVER:
Magcloud: http://bit.ly/2nrBJDj

DIGITAL (TWO OPTIONS):
ePub: http://amzn.to/2kzWGw0
iBook: http://apple.co/2nHZMBq

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