Friday, April 15, 2016

My Malus 'Prairfire' (Prairfire Crabapple)


Ever since I helped rescue Super, a migratory bird who is a Northern Flicker, all of my postings, except for one, have been about that injured bird. It is my intention to visit Super at least once a week until he is able to be released from the bird rehabilitation facility on NYC's Upper Westside to Central Park. I would gladly see him more often, but the facility where Super is recovering is very busy. I don't want to interfere with their efforts to help Super or the other injured birds they are treating.

Meanwhile, I am doing my best to maintain my urban rooftop garden and  keep it a haven for the urban birds who have visited it over the years. My garden can be seen in the photograph atop today's Blogger entry. I took the image from the vantage point of a nearby penthouse garden. The picture was taken in 2015 during the late summer or early fall; and Cam, a cardinal who visited me during that time, insisted we include it in the ePub (Kindle) version of our book Words In Our Beak Volume One.





In any event, there have been a few changes to my garden since I took the photograph while visiting the aforementioned penthouse. One of those changes has been my procuring a Prairfire crabapple tree (AKA Malus 'Prairfire') this past March. For those who are not familar with this tree, I took the following pictures of is tag.





And this crabapple tree can be seen in the photograph below in an image taken before I even unwrapped it.



The following picture shows where my tree was ultimately placed.(indicated by a white square imposed over it) 


My Prairfire crabapple is producing wonderful buds and it is proving to be a place where some of the bird types that visit my garden can enjoy. And many birds have already begun to avail themselves of solace in the arms of this tree, including members of the house finch family. House finches are one of a number of bird types Cam discusses in her book. The next pictures show a male house finch checking out the characteristics of this awesome tree.





The way birds "interact" with flora is a topic Cam discusses at length in "Words In Our Beak, Volume One."  As you will see when you read the book, birds are very observant in being aware of the characteristics of flora; and they even have a name for their activity in doing this: floraing. 

Birds are also prone to observing people, and the finch featured here is no exception. He isn't shy when it comes to gawking at humans.



Just as some folks use the term "birding" to describe an activity of bird watching; birds have their own term for their activity of watching people: peopleing. Cam also discusses this in her book, and she points out, that, when it comes to people-ing, "New York City is the place to be if you are a bird." Cam's claim regarding NYC and birds, is even featured on WNYC's A New York Values Vision Board.

If truth be told, it seems when the birds in my garden are looking at me, it is usually their "subtle" way of  hinting that I should fill my bird feeders. But, that, as "they" say is another story...

No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.