Wednesday, July 11, 2012

"If it's Tuesday, it must be tumblr . . . " Week No. 26

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

In yesterday's entry here on Blogger, I promised that, even though today is is a Tuesday, which on TLLG's Blogger means it must be tumblr, I would start off with an update on the fate of my Japanese Larch (Larix Kaempferi), after Juan V came over to evaluate my sweet larch's fate. I was so devastated yesterday that I did not have the heart to publish a photograph of her revealing how she looks in a sad state because I respect my wonderful Larch, and I do not like to showcase her when she is feeling down. But it's important, I think, for people who are learning about gardening to know some of the back stories, and that even though one may be the most attentive of gardeners, there is no guarantee that the fate of what one grows will always be positive.
Moreover, since the slogan for my current project, where I am giving voice to gardens, and which I recently launched on indiegogo, is,"The very old, they are miracles like the just born; close to the end is precious like close to the beginning," I need to post images and facts about all aspects of garden life. In any event, the image at the top of today's blog entry shows how my Japanese Larch (Larix Kaempferi) looked a few days ago when she succumbed to a week of scorching temperatures which produuced a real feel of over one hundred degrees! Her bedraggled look is very uncharacteristic, and, under better circumstances, her appearance is more like the following:


Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

But the elements of nature are what they are, and farmers in the midwest during this heat wave are trying to cope with their own loss of crops of corn. Still, in spite of how depleted my Larch looks now, I am hoping she somehow pulls through. Juan V checked her bark and part of it looks as if she has a chance to pull through and live, but, part of it looks a though she will no longer be with us. For now, we have shaken off all her needles (so that she can use all her energy to heal from the heat wave trauma) as seen in the image below:


Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

She has now been placed in another area of my garden, an area which Juan V and I call the intensive care unit.  The "intensive area" cannot be seen in the image below, which is an aerial view of my garden that Juan V took yesterday, 



but, I can tell you that the area is in the extreme right hand corner of Juan's image, and as you might surmise from his photograph, my Larch will have plenty of moral support from tge things I grow in my garden and I hope this, along with the care Juan V and I give it will revive my sweet Larch.

Within the next few days, I will post the comic strip I created in my Larch's honor, as discussed in yesterday's post, but, once again, since today is Tuesday, it must be tumblr, and without further delay, here is the link to take you there.

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