Friday, March 16, 2012

"The winter that wasn't . . . " (at least in NYC)

Words In Our Beak’s goal is to open readers to a simple understanding of the winged world and their environment. Set in a rooftop urban garden in New York City, my story is told in the voice of Cam, a female cardinal, who visits it. Words In Our Beak is directed to children and adults who are curious about birds, and want to learn about them from a unique perspective. The book includes hundreds of images of flora and fauna, links to movies, as well as to informative narratives that have been created by the author.  Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11


Words In Our Beak’s goal is to open readers to a simple understanding of the winged world and their environment. Set in a rooftop urban garden in New York City, my story is told in the voice of Cam, a female cardinal, who visits it. Words In Our Beak is directed to children and adults who are curious about birds, and want to learn about them from a unique perspective. The book includes hundreds of images of flora and fauna, links to movies, as well as to informative narratives that have been created by the author.  Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11


One day the temperatures are in the mid-seventies, the next day they are only in the mid-forties; and it's only mid-March in New York City, where I live and have a terrace garden. From what I understand, these "mood swing" temperatures are occurring in many parts of the world.

The tulips that I grow here. as I pointed out in my last entry here on Blogger, were poking out of their winter gear with such zeal that Juan V and I were 'forced" to unwrap them from their winter protection ("clothing"), which we had so lovingly provided for them in December of 2011, when we did the majority of my annual garden winterizing. 

These (and many of their siblings) members of the Kaufmanniana Tulipa family appeared just a few days after I posted the collage of them (and am reposting it below for easy reference:


Words In Our Beak’s goal is to open readers to a simple understanding of the winged world and their environment. Set in a rooftop urban garden in New York City, my story is told in the voice of Cam, a female cardinal, who visits it. Words In Our Beak is directed to children and adults who are curious about birds, and want to learn about them from a unique perspective. The book includes hundreds of images of flora and fauna, links to movies, as well as to informative narratives that have been created by the author.  Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

In any event, the Tulipa Kaufmanniana family (I have a number of varieties) seem to be the ones with "eager-beaver-spring-fever," as indicated by the images of two of them above today's blog entry, in which they appear to be singing arias in conjunction with the birds chirping around them!

They are taking life as it comes, enjoying the moment, with full knowledge, just like their gardener's (yours truly) that winter could still come back, which would literally nip them in the bud! Indeed, the early spring brings with it much concern to many people.

For example, in last night's edition of The New York Daily News, I came across a letter to the "VOICE OF THE PEOPLE," section, which appeared in the newspapers as follows:

"The winter that wasn't" 

"Brooklyn: Is anyone besides me mourning the fact that we did not have a real winter this year? The unbelievably warm weather is nothing more than another indicator that the climate is indeed changing. Enjoy your future peril. Irwin Cantos"

But, perhaps, (and pardon me if I sound presumptuous), if we have done all that we can do on a personal level to take care of our Kaufmanniana family, and live in the moment, with whatever that brings. This is not easy to do — even for Kaufmanniana tulips — as evident by photo-op below of one of the siblings from my Tulipa Kaufmanniana family seen in the images below,


Words In Our Beak’s goal is to open readers to a simple understanding of the winged world and their environment. Set in a rooftop urban garden in New York City, my story is told in the voice of Cam, a female cardinal, who visits it. Words In Our Beak is directed to children and adults who are curious about birds, and want to learn about them from a unique perspective. The book includes hundreds of images of flora and fauna, links to movies, as well as to informative narratives that have been created by the author.  Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

she is clearly hesitant to join her "comrades," or perhaps she is just shy, unlike one of my talkative tulips, who last season, had no problem expressing her feelings here on Blogger in a number of posts, including ones which you may refer to by clicking here and here.

That's it for today, dear reader, until next time, The Kauffmannia Family and I wish you a happy-end-of-winter or hapy-early-spring!

4 comments:

  1. The Kauffmanniana Family is thrilled that you find them beautiful, Angela.

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  2. I am enjoying the mild winter and early spring. In the country there are dire predictions of the bugs that will come in hordes b/c they weren't killed off by a cold winter. But I can only manage the difficulties that I am tripping over on my path right now, not the ones around the bend. So I, too, am just enjoying the blooms! Stevie@ruffledfeathersandspilledmilk.com

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  3. You are absolutely right, Stevie! "Sufficient unto the day . . ., " as the saying goes. I hope you continue to enjoy not only spring, but life as it presents itself! Thanks for visiting my blog, taking the time to comment and subtly reminding me to not focus on what might or might not be "around the bend."

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