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Friday, December 16, 2011

Friday Follow Up: "the reindeer effect"

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

It is TGIF (Thank God It's Friday) on TLLG, and, as you undoubtedly know from a plan I posted this past October, I try to dedicate Fridays as an "opportunity" to follow-up on things which are in the news or which I have discussed, hence the clever post title, Friday Follow-Up 0-8

This past Tuesday on tumblr, (where I "send" TLLG Blog Spot followers on Tuesdays), I wrote about "the reindeer effect" in relation to a reindeer figurine, who lives in my indoor succulent garden, and I accompanied what I said with the following image of that particular reindeer.


Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

Today's post has to do with some reindeer that are new arrivals  to my urban (NYC) terrace garden, and who can be seen in the photograph at the top of today's blog entry.


These reindeer flew in yesterday afternoon "landing" on the planter that is the home to my Autumn Clematis, who is attempting to go to the sleep for the season. (Hence, she has pulled a blanket of evergreens over herself, but she did not put up a "Do Not Disturb" sign, so the Mama Reindeer and her twins plopped themselves atop the Autumn Clematis's blanket of evergreen.) 

As you can see, from the aforementioned photograph at the very top of this blog post, Mama Reindeer and her twins seem to be marveling at the fact that my Helichrysum bracteatum AKA Strawflowers (the yellow flowers which can be seen in the lower lefthand corner of that imageare still blooming when it is currently mid December. And they are enjoying the scent from the Lavandula dentata (French Lavender) which is still thriving directly behind where the newly arrived reindeer are standing!

While the reindeer are pleased that it is not so cold, and are enjoying the bright and brilliant yellow flowers from my Helichrysum bracteatum, which is what I can surmise from their conversation, and perhaps you can surmise from the surprised expressions that you undoubtedly notice on their faces, as evidenced in the photograph posed below, 


Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

they are concerned about something, and I suspect their concern has to do with global warming. I am sure you will agree from the expressions on their faces, which look even more profound in the following image, 

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

that they seem most concerned indeed, and I am quite touched to think that they seem to have such a concern for their environment! It seems to be in these three visiting reindeers' genes to have a concern for the planet; after all, each one of them has a body made of a trunk from Christmas trees being sold in my New York City neighborhood. Their little legs are also made of pieces of Christmas tree trunks, and their antlers are made from Christmas tree branches. Moreover, their tiny tails are each made from a pine cone. This is why — the fact that they are made from "recycled" parts that are tossed from Christmas trees — I assumed that they were totally consumed with environmental concerns. But, alas even my reindeer have their price!

This is evidenced in the image posted below of the three of them eyeing my Tropaelum majus (Nasturtium), which is also still thriving in mid December.   

Patricia Youngquist uses words and images to tell stories about her passions. Based in New York, she currently is authoring a series of nature books on birds of the city. Now in Apple’s iBooks store @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/words-in-our-beak/id1010889086?mt=11

I always find my Tropaelum majus is much too pretty to eat, although many folks do put them in salads and incorporate them into a number of recipes. I still prefer them to be a source of inspiration for blog posts on TLLG (which you may read by clicking here).

I hope the visiting reindeer also find my Tropaelum majus's flowers inspiring, and all I can say to them, which is a modification of the "famous expression" Please Don't Eat the Daises is . . .  . . . [drum roll] . . .  you guessed it, Please Don't Eat the Tropaelum majus!

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