Sunday, October 14, 2018

Number 13 is a Palm Warbler


This past Friday while walking in Central Park where I was on a mission to observe squirrels un honor of Squirrel Awareness Month, I encountered a bird type unfamiliar to me, making this my thirteenth new acquaintance in this Year of the Bird. I have since learned the creature who I noticed is a Palm Warbler* and the little one can be seen in the image atop this entry.

My previous encounters (during this year) re bird types new to me in Central Park have been with an American Coot, a Bufflehead Duck, a Great Egret, a Great Blue Heron, a Gray Cat Bird, a Northern Pintail, a Red-Bellied Woodpecker, a Red-Winged Black Bird, a Ruddy Duck, and a couple of Wooden Ducks.

Newbies to me in this Year of the Bird also include Laughing Gulls whom I saw when I was visiting Long Beach and also a Red-Tailed Hawk who was "hanging out" in the branches of an Ailanthus Tree in my courtyard, they can be seen in the images below.



The red-tailed hawk is featured in volume three (ISBN: 978099637853) of my Words In Our Beak book series, which can be seen in the next picture.


If there are no further problems with my publisher I should receive my proof copy within a few business days after this coming Tuesday. It's been a fretful time dealing with them, so I best put my attention on observing the creatures in Central Park. Maybe I'll even meet a new bird variety meanwhile, I'll see what I can learn about "number thirteen," the Palm Warbler.

As for you, dear reader, I'll keep you posted on what I discover re this latest creature as well as with updated info on the availability of Words In Our Beak Volume Three. For now, here is the purchase info for the books that are available:

Volume One: ISBN: 9780996378529
Book Seller Info: http://bit.ly/2AFZDCz
Barnes & Noble On-Line: http://bit.ly/2AAnB26
book culture On Columbus (a bookstore on the UWS in NYC): http://bit.ly/2FsC1Uf

Volume Two: ISBN: 9780996378536
Book Seller Info: http://bit.ly/2q75g8e
Barnes & Noble On-Line: http://bit.ly/2G65m6H

* I learned of this bird's ID from Dr. Robert DeCandido PhD and I thank him for that. His name may sound familiar to NYC readers as he leads bird walks in the city (which I hope that I can attend when my circumstances improve). Moreover, I have referenced him in prior entries here on Blogger as he has helped me ID avian creatures in the past.

I also thank Amanda Remsberg, bird rehabber extraordinaire, for weighing in on the subject! She has helped me with many answers re wild birds and if her name sounds familiar to you, Amanda has been mentioned in prior entries. Btw, I caught another glimpse of the Palm Warbler, the following day, but it was only a passing glimpse (as evidenced in the image below) I absolutely plan to learn more about this bird type in the coming days...and when I do, I'll share my discoveries Stay tuned!


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