Monday, February 29, 2016

A Leap of Faith for Leap Year Day


Happy New Year, rather Happy Leap New Year! As you most likely know, this holiday only occurs ever four years. And in honor of the event, I'm including a copy of portion of a letter that the writer E.B.White wrote to Gluyas Williams in the 1970's: "The only date I would like to see shifted is December 25th, which I would like shifted to February 29th, so that occurs only once every four years. This would have a profoundly beneficial effect on the nation and would set me back even course again."

You may recognize the reference as I mentioned it a recent blog post where you can find E.B. White's entire letter to Glyas Williams.

Also in honor of this holiday, I'm including a photograph (above this entry) of one of the musicians in residence in my indoor succulent garden. As most of you probably know, I have an outdoor (rooftop) garden as well (pictured below).



And you may also know that my rooftop garden is the setting for a book ("Words In Our Beak Volume One") that I wrote with Cam, a female cardinal who was a regular visitor to it.

In any event, the musician in residence that I am featuring today may also be familiar to you, dear reader, for he has been here on Blogger in bygone years to announce the onset of spring. However, today he is here to exercise his bragging rights in relation to Leap Year's Day.
He has just informed me that he wants to use the day as an opportunity to share information (that he got from WIKI) re a children's game known as Leap Frog, hence his bragging rights in terms of this holiday, Here is the information on the matter:


"Leapfrog is a children's game in which players vault over each other's stooped backs. Games of this sort have been called by this name since at least the late sixteenth century. They also played this in colonial America.
"The first participant rests hands on knees and bends over, which is called giving a back. The next player places hands on the first's back and leaps over by straddling legs wide apart on each side. On landing he stoops down and a third leaps over the first and second, and the fourth over all others successively. When all the players are stooping, the last in the line begins leaping over all the others in turn. The number of participants is not fixed.
"The French version of this game is called saute-mouton (literally 'leapsheep'), and the Romanian is called capra ('mounting rack' or 'goat'). In India it is called as 'Aar Ghodi Ki Par Ghodi' (meaning 'horseleap'). In Italy the game is called 'la cavallina' (i.e. 'small or baby female horse'). In Dutch it is called 'bokspringen' (literally 'goatjumping' a 'bok' is a male goat) or 'haasje-over' (literally 'hare-over').
"In the Korean and Japanese versions (말뚝박기 lit. 'piledriving' and 馬跳び うまとび umatobi, lit. 'horseleap', respectively), one player 'leaps' over the backs of the other players who stoop close enough to form a continuous line, attempting to cause the line to collapse under the weight of the riders."
And on this Leap Year Day, dear reader, I leave you with my musician in residence's knowedge on the game of Leap Frog, but not before wishing you a Happy Leap Year Day and hope you will take the leap of faith and do what you've been meaning to do on this holiday, even though that probably will not involve playing Leap Frog!  



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